A grand wedding at the Grand Concourse

The ceremony and reception for one of last weekend’s weddings was at the Grand Concourse at Station Square in Pittsburgh. Flowers transformed an already elegant venue into a bride’s dream. Take a look.

Wedding ceremony location, Grand Concourse

Wedding ceremony location, Grand Concourse

Banister arrangement, Grand Concourse

Banister arrangement, Grand Concourse

Wedding ceremony arrangement

Wedding ceremony arrangement

Lamp post arrangement, Grand Concourse

Lamp post arrangement, Grand Concourse

Table centerpiece

Table centerpiece

Carnation ball table centerpiece

Carnation ball table centerpiece

Cake table with garland, candles and mini hydrangea arrangements

Cake table with garland, candles and mini hydrangea arrangements

And if you ever wondered what our truck looks like on the way to a wedding, here’s a peek from another wedding from the weekend!

Wedding flower delivery

Wedding flower delivery

 

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A lavender floral pallette for a November Pittsburgh wedding…

Our featured wedding this week was a vision of shades of lavender. The bridesmaids’ bouquets featured hydrangea, stock, lisianthus and freesia.

BW-136Bridesmaid bouquet

The table centerpieces contained hydrangea, lisianthus, stock, kale and seeded eucalyptus.

Wedding centerpiece

Here’s a photo of the wedding cake decorated with flowers, along with the toss bouquet. (Look carefully, and you can see our truck parked on the street below!)

Wedding cake with flowers

The Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel was beautiful!

Renaissance Hotel wedding reception

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Taste of Pittsburgh gift basket updates…

We’ve been tweaking recipes to our Taste of Pittsburgh gift baskets, as we add some new La Dorita Dulce de LechePittsburgh products we’ve recently discovered.

One product we especially like is Dulce de leche from La Dorita in Sharpsburg.  Dulce de leche is a milk spread from Argentina that is similar to caramel.   It can be used as a spread for bread or toast, as a topping for pancakes, or can be served warm over ice cream.  It’s great this time of year as a dip for apples.  It is featured in our A ‘Burgh Homecoming basket, or may be added to any of our fruit and gourmet baskets.

After many years, we are again using a Natrona Bottling product in our baskets.  Natrona’s Red Ribbon Natrona bottling Red Ribbon Cherry Supreme SodaCherry Supreme soda is their flagship product.  It is made in small batches using 100% cane sugar and other high quality ingredients.  Natrona is one of the last soda makers still bottling in glass.  A bottle of Red Ribbon Cherry Supreme can be found in our Pittsburgh Snack Sampler and Black and Gold baskets.

Biscotti Brothers traditional Italian bakery in Greensburg is our new source for biscotti and pizelles for our Pittsburgh baskets.  Their classic biscotti have no preservatives, no trans-fats, no artificial flavors and no GMO ingredients, while being Kosher certified.  Both biscotti and pizelles are delicious, and can be added to any of our fruit and gourmet baskets.

Our Taste of Pittsburgh baskets are a favorite gift for anyone who is a fan of “da Burgh.”  We can deliver them locally, or ship anywhere in the US with FedEx.  Keep them in mind for the upcoming holidays!

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Flowers from a Carnegie Museum wedding…

A glimpse of flowers from the Blumengarten, provided for a recent wedding at the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh:

Bridesmaid bouquetsBridesmaids bouquets of hydrangea, spray roses and kermit pomps.

Img_2539.jpg reducedHuppah with dogwood, spider mums and snapdragon, set up in the Hall of Sculpture

Img_2542.jpg reducedChair decorations of silk rose pomander balls

Img_2532 reducedTall centerpieces of oriental lilies, larkspur, hydrangea, and lisianthus

Img_2534 reducedLow centerpieces of white and green hydrangea and beargrass

Img_2536.jpg reducedCarnegie Music Hall foyer

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Poinsettia care

It wouldn’t be Christmas without the glorious poinsettia plant!  These beauties are native to Mexico.  The showy colored parts of the poinsettia plant are not really the flowers, but are actually bracts or modified leaves.  The flowers are the small yellow buds in the center of the colorful bracts.  For the longest lasting poinsettia, choose a plant with little or no yellow pollen showing.

Thanks to the Society of American Florists and the University of Illinois for the following poinsettia info:

To keep your poinsettia blooming, keep it in indirect light, out of hot or cold drafts.  Water the plant thoroughly when the surface soil is dry to the touch, but do not allow it to sit in water.

Poinsettias are not poisonous! A study at Ohio State University showed that a 50-pound child would have to eat more than a pound-and-a-quarter of Poinsettia leaves (500 to 600 leaves) to have any side effects.  The leaves are reportedly not very tasty, so it’s highly unlikely that kids or even pets would be able to eat that many!

Poinsettias are a member of the Euphorbiaceae family, and ooze a milky sap. Some people with latex allergies have had a skin reaction (most likely to the sap) after touching the leaves.  From personal experience, we know to be careful not to get the sap in your eyes.  Our Jim once ended up in the emergency room here in Pittsburgh with a scratched cornea after trimming a euphobia and then rubbing his eye!

People often ask us how to get a poinsettia to re-bloom.  You can do the following:

  • In spring, when the bracts fade, cut stems back to eight inches above the soil line.
  • Continue to water regularly.
  • Lightly fertilize with a good, balanced all-purpose fertilizer every three to four weeks.
  • When temperatures are warm, place the plant outdoors; first in indirect, then direct sunlight. Avoid temperatures below 50 degrees throughout the summer.
  • July 4 (Independence Day): Cut back new growth stems. Repot if needed.
  • Early September (Labor Day): Move the plant inside. Provide six or more hours of direct light.
  • October 1 through mid-December: Confine the plant to complete darkness for 14 hours, giving it 10 hours of natural light daily. This will set the buds and cause bracts to color.

Or…you can follow the advice our Tim posted on facebook:

First you want to put the plant in a dark closet after it loses its color. Then each week lay a quarter on the soil of the pot. Keep this routine up until a couple of weeks before Christmas. Then you’ll have saved enough money to buy yourself a new poinsettia.

Purchase these beautiful and lasting Christmas plants early, and enjoy them all season long!

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